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The Rhyme Report 10th May 2017

10 May 2017 Blues Music Chicago Blues Country Blues Delta Blues Jump Blues Nothin' But The Blues Rhyme Report


Greetings Gisters,

 

Well, here we are, at episode 12 – and a completion to Season 1 of Nothin’ But The Blues. For the benefit of those who came in late – or, who may have missed the odd episode, we’ll be repeating the series here on The Gist, from the beginning, commencing next week. Also, all episodes are now streaming on demand down at the Trés Le Parque:  https://tresleparque.net

In the meantime, Alexa and I will be heads-down and busy with the research and production of a second season along with some other projects currently in development, including a YouTube-friendly video of an episode of Nothin’ But The Blues from this current season. But more about all that, later.

For this instalment, I thought it might be an opportune time to deliver on some promises made in earlier editions. Namely, the revisiting of the popular predilection in the Blues towards the subject of drinking Alcohol – or, the art of being drunk. So we’re stretching the concept to the point at which the state of drunkenness is best described as being high. Speaking in defence of this demanding lifestyle choice are, Albert Collins, Detroit Junior – and John Lee Hooker. Seriously though, there were many other likely contenders, prepared to put forward their own arguments.

Also in this edition, we close-out our exposé of the ‘Three Kings Of Blues Guitar’ with a sampling of the work by the final member of that much-revered troika, Albert King.As a guitarist, Albert King was a notable influence on many other respected Blues guitarists including, Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughan (with whom he recorded) and in particular, Eric Clapton.

Like the booze, a subject common to all music styles is the Train – and the huge scope of symbolism it can evoke. In this edition, we check into the impression this powerful mode of transport has left on the Blues. Not simply as a representation of power, the Train has also been viewed as a means of taking away a loved one – or, as a way of delivering a soul to it’s ultimate destination, be it heaven, or be it hell.

And finally, for no other reason than to support the fact that the Blues is much more than the musical embodiment of doom and gloom, we also dip into the world of Vaudeville. Like the closely-related styles of Jug Band Music and Hokum Blues, vintage Vaudeville was often the source of humour – and playfulness – giving balance to the pathos so often associated with Blues.

You’ll hear Blues of ‘actual’ vintage from a true superstar of the era, Cliff Edwards (aka Ukulele Ike) as well as more contemporary expressions of the Vaudeville style from such notable Australian interpreters as, C.W. Stoneking – and living national treasure, Mic Conway.

And yeah, I understand… you’re wondering just how we’re gonna fit all that into a single locomotive hour of thoroughly entertaining Blues radio?

Be on the Blues train this Saturday at noon (CST) (and bring your own beverages) – and I promise, we’ll have some compelling answers to that question.

 

However, if you’re  unable to join us then, check-in for the special ‘Encore Edition’, during it’s re-transmission on Wednesday evening at 7pm (CST).

 

Later, agitator!

And as always, thanks for listening.

Gideon Rhyme  –  Cultural Detective

 

PLAYLIST:

 

“I Ain’t Drunk”  –  Albert Collins

 

“If I Hadn’t Been High”  –  Detroit Junior

“One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer”  –  John Lee Hooker

“Black Diamond Express To Hell (Intro)”  –  Rev. A.W. Nix

“Train To Nowhere”  –  Savoy Brown

 

“Mystery Train”  –  The Paul Butterfield Blues Band

“Love In Vain”  –  The Rolling Stones

“Black Diamond Express To Hell (Outro)”  –  Rev. A.W. Nix

“Born Under A Bad Sign”  –  Albert King

“Blues Power”  –  Albert King

“Talkin’ Lion Blues”  –  C.W. Stoneking

“I Want To Walk In Again Blues”  –  Ukulele Ike (Cliff Edwards)

“Department Store Baby”  –  Mic Conway & Robbie Long

 


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